By Guy Boyle

Design Council

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Info

Four Second Memory is the virtual home of Guy Boyle.

FSM: Design highlights a small selection of completed design projects.

DESIGN SERVICES

Web site design, illustration, animation. Brand development and consultancy. Spatial design.

INDUSTRY ROLES

Artworker, Designer, Digital Imaging Manager, Design Manager, Creative Director. Currently working as a Freelance Designer.

CLIENTS

I have worked, usually indirectly, for clients that include:

Barclays, BBC, Bench, Boots, The British Museum, The Carphone Warehouse, Cartoon Network, Conde Naste, Daks, The Design Council, The Design Museum, Diesel, Disney Stores, EMI, Esquire Magazine, Exposure, Givenchy, Halifax, Haribo, Harrods, House of Fraser, Imperial War Museum, Kookai, Levis, Marks & Spencer, MGA, PLAN, Procter and Gamble, Royal Court Theatre, Schuh, Sony, Ted Baker, UNIQLO, United International Pictures, Virgin, Vodaphone.

EDUCATOR

I worked for 7 years as a Visiting Tutor on the Media Pathway of the BA (Hons) Arts & Design course at Central St. Martins. Later co-ran the first year of the course for a year after it had become University of the Arts, London: BA (Hons) Arts, Design & Environment as a Senior Tutor.

LINKS

FSM: Research
NINE FROM NINE
http://twitter.com/#!/Ninefromnine

CONTACT

Email Guy

SOCIAL

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SHOP

society6
NINE FROM NINE Preorders

Design In Britain


Ads for a Design Council discussion forum. Featured in The Independent, booklets and cards.


090530_independent_layout2



#Branding

#Graphic

#Grids


Symple Shortcodes is the best Free shortcodes plugin out there.


Symple Shortcodes is the best Free shortcodes plugin out there.


Features

  • Easy to update WordPress content management website.
  • Responsive layout- adapts to different screen sizes to provide an optimal viewing experience on a large screen, tablet or phone.
  • Copywriting. Extensive work with the client defining concise headings, introductions and then explanations for key concepts.
  • Shortcodes to provide extra elements like buttons and interactive text sections.
  • Sourcing of appropriate, royalty and copyright free photography.
  • Contact forms.
  • Icons to represent key services.
  • Extras: Social media -Twitter, LinkedIn. Google Ads.

The Binary Stripe


CPSS Identity Design

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Branding-Identity-Mockup

letter

cover

inv
back


squares


squares


squares


squares


CPSS Brand Identity


Responsive website as part of a brand development project for Air Networks. The brief was to communicate technical concepts in a clear, jargon free way.



#Branding

#Graphic

#Grids


Symple Shortcodes is the best Free shortcodes plugin out there.


Symple Shortcodes is the best Free shortcodes plugin out there.


Features

  • Easy to update WordPress content management website.
  • Responsive layout- adapts to different screen sizes to provide an optimal viewing experience on a large screen, tablet or phone.
  • Copywriting. Extensive work with the client defining concise headings, introductions and then explanations for key concepts.
  • Shortcodes to provide extra elements like buttons and interactive text sections.
  • Sourcing of appropriate, royalty and copyright free photography.
  • Contact forms.
  • Icons to represent key services.
  • Extras: Social media -Twitter, LinkedIn. Google Ads.

The Binary Stripe

stripe

The Binary Square

squares


Air Networks Responsive Website

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Responsive-Screen-Mockup-1200-b

Air Networks Responsive Website

Responsive website as part of a brand development project for Air Networks. The brief was to communicate technical concepts in a clear, jargon free way.

Visit Air Networks Site


Features

  • Easy to update WordPress content management website.
  • Responsive layout- adapts to different screen sizes to provide an optimal viewing experience on a large screen, tablet or phone.
  • Copywriting. Extensive work with the client defining concise headings, introductions and then explanations for key concepts.
  • Shortcodes to provide extra elements like buttons and interactive text sections.
  • Sourcing of appropriate, royalty and copyright free photography.
  • Contact forms.
  • Icons to represent key services.
  • Extras: Social media -Twitter, LinkedIn. Google Ads.

services-icon-strip

Hamiltons Identity

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Responsive-Screen-Mockup-1200-b

Air Networks Responsive Website

Responsive website as part of a brand development project for Air Networks. The brief was to communicate technical concepts in a clear, jargon free way.

Visit Air Networks Site


Features

  • Easy to update WordPress content management website.
  • Responsive layout- adapts to different screen sizes to provide an optimal viewing experience on a large screen, tablet or phone.
  • Copywriting. Extensive work with the client defining concise headings, introductions and then explanations for key concepts.
  • Shortcodes to provide extra elements like buttons and interactive text sections.
  • Sourcing of appropriate, royalty and copyright free photography.
  • Contact forms.
  • Icons to represent key services.
  • Extras: Social media -Twitter, LinkedIn. Google Ads.

 

services-icon-strip

BLOG: Nine from Nine Project Information

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Guy Boyle runesong blog header

Introduction

Inspired by the BBC documentary The Viking Sagas I started some basic research into Norse mythology with the intention to produce two or three illustrations.

There are two key Icelandic manuscripts that contain the oldest written records of Norse mythology.  These works are The Younger or Prose Edda and The Elder or Poetic Edda I’ve concentrated on The Poetic Edda, a collection of Old Norse poems dating back to the Viking Age and collected later in the manuscript Codex Regius.

Project Outline

I’m producing illustrations for Ljóðatal, a poem from the Hávamál section of The Poetic Edda. The poem is an account of the god Odin’s eighteen magical songs.

The scope of the project is far broader than I originally intended and will now likely require twenty or more illustrations.

Ljóðatal

There is some scholarly debate around the manuscript and particularly this poem. Much of this debate centers around the authenticity and interpretation of the source material. My thanks to Professor John McKinnell for taking the time to respond to my questions and for his invaluable article that helped me to understand the debate more clearly. Wisdom from the Dead: the Ljóðatal section of Hávamál informed my stance on the poem and is linked below.

I have based my text on a translation by Benjamin Thorpe. This translation is one of the more faithful to the original structure and wording of the poem.

Breakdown of the Poem

The father of the gods, Odin is obsessed with aquiring arcane knowledge. He has previously given up an eye in exchange for a chance to make use of Mimir’s well of knowledge.

At the start of the poem one-eyed Odin hangs on the tree, Yggdrasill. He stabs himself with his spear, sacrificing himself to himself. Now dead and in the underworld he aquires knowledge of nine songs (charms or spells) from a giant, his unnamed maternal uncle. Odin is re-born, wiser and inspired. He is able to create a new song from each of the nine taught to him. A stanza is then dedicated to a desciption of the powerful magical effects of each song.

Further Reading

The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson. Tr. from the original Old Norse text into English by Benjamin Thorpe, and The Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson Tr. from the original Old Norse text into English by I. A. Blackwell (1906)

The Elder or Poetic Edda; commonly known as Saemund’s Edda. Edited and translated with introd. and notes by Oliver Bray. Illustrated by W.G. Collingwood (1908)

McKinnell, John. 2007. ‘Wisdom from the Dead: the Ljóðatal section of Hávamál’. Medium Ævum 76: 85-115.

 

 

Life Begins at 40 (Last Night a Grid Saved My Life)

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lifeat40

A student once asked me how I learnt about the design process. After a few second pause I had to reply “Probably playing with Lego as a child”. That may have been the start of understanding physical and spatial issues but the development of my visual language really started at art college.

At college I became interested in the work of abstract and colourist painters. I was interested in the line that I could trace from Manet to Abstraction. I needed to add my interests and then I felt I’d have the basis for a developing practice.

I felt that computers were going to be important and wondered if I could use them to produce work. I’d so far, grown up in an analogue world. College had a basic Mac computer that sat in a room gathering dust but the Animation Department had a few Amiga computers that I experimented with. After college I bought an Amiga 1200 and started to produce short animated loops on it. A few years later I bought a second-hand PC and have never looked back.

I was also interested in Science Fiction and narratives. Needless to say, the next 20 years were tricky. My time has been spent balancing, pondering, adjusting, re-starting work with disparate elements that were never really supposed to work together.

I found that I had to learn about typography and graphic design to structure much of my work especially with a real, new interest in design for the web.

Recently I’d been working too slowly. My process was becoming unproductive. This was largely a result of producing work that was too complicated, that had too many elements and so required too many decent decisions to produce a reasonable piece of work.

After Christmas this year I decided to produce the simplest work possible. I set a limit of about 5 key decision per piece. The last few years it has occurred to me that it’s all about decisions. A piece of work can be assessed on the quality of the decisions made during the process. Are those decision dynamic, creative, informed and relevant?

I found that an understanding of painting wasn’t helping me. I didn’t need to think pictorially I needed to think graphically. I didn’t want to spend time with nuance but instead make simple, graphic statements. I looked at grids and early Modernist typography. I started to produce a piece of work a day. I can now productively deal with the work that i’m interested in and haven’t enjoyed producing my work this much for years.

I’ve never known how to categorise myself and often default to ‘Designer’. Soon it may be ‘Graphic Designer’.

Drawing: Representation of Form Workshop

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BA (Hons) Arts, Design + Environment Stage 1 Project 4 Brief
Drawing: Representation of Form
Handout: 29th October Workshop: 29th and 30th October Review: 5th November

Part 1 Workshop Brief

This workshop is concerned with representing form and describing space. Your drawings will have key requirements and be expected to work within the larger framework of the project.

There will be an emphasis on accuracy of line and we would like you to consider each mark you make carefully. The paper size will be very small and you will not be able to erase any marks. We would like you to reflect on how in this instance and in many other situations your work is the result of key decisions that should be rationalised and quantified with an aim to fulfilling predefined or self initiated objectives. What you decide to leave out of a drawing could often be as important as the elements you include.

You will be asked to form groups and for the individuals of each group to sit at an approximately equal distance, encircling a chosen object. You will be asked to produce drawings, that when viewed sequentially describe the form of the object in a 360 degree arc. You will be given instructions detailing a particular format of paper and how much time to spend on each drawing. This will create a uniformity across the resulting drawings that can then be assembled into a flip-book.

The flip-books are a simple, lateral way to represent the given form in 3D. Can you think of different or more sophisticated ways of approaching this in terms of drawing?

Part 2 Independent Study Research Brief

Research a practitioner that you believe has represented form or space in an interesting or particularly effective way. Produce print-outs or photocopies of examples of this work and bring them to the Part 3 Workshop.

Part 3 Workshop Brief

You will be asked to present the drawings of your chosen practitioner for discussion.

We will examine the different possibilities presented for the representation of form and space through drawing. We would like you to reflect on how these methods might inform your practice.

You will then be required to produce 3 drawings: 1) A representation of a space populated by objects and people. 2) A representation of the same space, but devoid of objects and people. 3) A detail of the space, preferably in relation to you pathway study.

Before starting each of these drawings spend at least 10 minutes sketching, to test the effectiveness of your ideas; your process and intended methods to achieve meaningful representation in your final drawings.

You will not only have to consider how you represent this space but how you physically negotiate the space in relation to your peers and the production of this work. You will have to plan your time carefully and may be required to adjust your methods and timeframe appropriately, throughout the session, if you encounter unforeseen problems.

At the end of this session you will be required to present your final drawings for discussion.

Part 4 Independent Study Brief

We would like you to produce for Review on 5th November a set of 8 drawings that continue to explore possibilities for the representation of form and space, with a pathway focus. These drawings, when presented in sequence should describe a 360 degree panorama of a space.

These drawings should represent the architecture of the environment, the space you are occupying or the objects that surround you.

Architecture students may concentrate on the structure(s) that define this space. Artifact students should consider how objects within this space might be represented, particularly in regard to appropriate detail to represent possible usage and possible inter-relationships. Spatial students should consider the nature of the space; divisions, usage, parameters and how this might be meaningfully represented.

BAADE Introduction to Presentation Boards Workshop

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BA (Hons) Arts, Design + Environment Stage 1 Workshop Brief

Introduction to Presentation Boards

Handout: 15th October    Workshop: 16th October

Preparation

This workshop will involves the use of photcopies of your Reverse Engineering visual narrative drawings.

Before the workshop begins make photocopies of your visual narrative drawings in at least two different sizes. For example a set of copies at 100mm wide and another at 200mm wide.

Brief

This workshop is concerned with presenting your work in meaningful and coherent ways. You will be asked to be creative in your approach to presentation while considering appropriate layouts to communicate your ideas clearly.

In this instance you are presenting a visual narrative. Can you think of examples of visual narratives? How are they presented? Are there specific visual devices employed or conventions adhered to that you should be aware of?

We will ask you to examine your work in terms of presentation.

What elements are most important? You will need to consider hierarchies of information and an appropriate consideration of this in its presentation. You should be objective in your analysis and consider if some elements of the project could be discarded or treated differently for less emphasis.

You will need to consider the interplay of image and type, relative scale, colour, line and any other elements that together, form a visual language. Should the presentation style reflect the process of your work or would a clear distinction aid communication?

These boards will need to communicate your project in isolation so consider what information is crucial to your audience.

Your objective is to create rough layouts using your photocopies with consideration of the above objectives and concerns. The emphasis in this workshop is on experimentation and analysis rather than a finished presentation for submission.